The Quincy Jones – Sammy Nestico Orchestra

Trumpet and trombones – R-121

Engineered and mixed by Tommy Vicari. Produced by Quincy Jones with Sammy Nestico and Jerry Hey.
Recorded at Capital Studios, Hollywood, CA
From the Qwest Records release “Basie & Beyond”.

Seven R-121’s capturing the trumpets and trombones.
Recorded digitally on Sony 3348-HR’s.

“Out Of The Night” (Sammy Nestico)

 

“Joy Of Cooking” (Sammy Nestico)

Michael DeTemple

Vocals – R-121
Banjo – R-121
Acoustic Guitar – R-121

Performed and recorded by Michael DeTemple.

Recording chain: R-121 directly into a Roland 1680 recorder in Michael’s home studio.

Banjo, guitar and vocal recorded separately using one R-121, then mixed in the Roland 1680.

“Fishin” (traditional)

Amalia Stephenson

Vocals – R-121
Acoustic Guitar – R-121

Engineer: Richard Dobson
Recorded to DAT in Richard’s home studio.

One forward-facing R-121 on vocals.
One R-121 on acoustic guitar, with a condenser mic lightly blended in.

“Silent Night” (Joseph Mohr)

Cannon

Vocals – R-121
Acoustic Guitar – R-121
Drum overheads – R-121

Producer: Shawn Sullivan. Engineer: Kyle Homme.
Recorded to Pro Tools at World Class Audio, Anaheim, CA.

One backward R-121 on vocals and acoustic guitars. Two R-121’s on drum overheads.

Sean Sullivan was the original discoverer of the backward R-121 recording technique. Due to our patented offset ribbon element, the back side of the microphone is slightly brighter than the front side when placed within 3 ft of any sound source.

“Again” (Dan Sistos & Jevon McGlory)


Cyrius

Percussion – R-121, SF-12
Congas – SF-12
Timbales – R-121

Engineered and mixed by Bruce Swedien. Produced by Bruce Swedien and Andres Levin.
Recorded at Studios EGREM – Havana, Cuba / Fun Machine Studios – New York, NY / Westviking Studios.

All percussion instruments recorded with R-121’s and an SF-12.

From the Sony Records France release “Le Sang Des Roses”.

 
“Tout ce Temps” (Boris Bergman & Cyrius Martinez)

Les Go

Percussion – R-121, SF-12

Recorded, mixed and produced by Bruce Swedien.
Recorded at Presence Studios and Westviking Studios. Mixed at Westviking Studios.
From the Juna release “Les Go.”

All percussion instruments recorded with two R-121’s and an SF-12 stereo ribbon microphone.

“Mother”

 

“Faso Den”

 

 

Kevin Shepard – Drum Tracks

Kick Drum –  R-121
Drum Overhead – SF-12
Comparison Tracks

Engineer: Roger Summers
Recorded at Royaltone Studios, Burbank, CA

Session drummer Kevin Shepard playing a Gretsch kit in a large iso booth.

Recording chain: all mics through Neve console preamps, recorded directly to DAT.

 
1. Kick Drum/Room – one R-121 three feet from the front head.

 
 

2. SF-12 overhead, lightly EQ’d to open up highs.

 

3.  C-24 overhead (same position as the SF-12, for comparison)

 

4.  SF-1’s overhead, lightly EQ’d.
(The SF-1 is discontinued, but the active SF-2 sounds identical and has higher output.)

 
 

5.  SF-12 overhead (lightly EQ’d) and one R-121 three feet off the kick drum.

 
 

6. SF-12 overhead and one R-121 three feet off the kick drum. Same track as #5, but with no EQ.

Kick Drum

Kick Drum – R-121

R-121 – 10 inches high and 20 inches off the front kick drum head. The microphone was leaned forward 45 degrees to take advance of the mic’s null points and isolate the kick drum from the rest of the kit.

Engineer – Les Camacho.
Recorded at Cornerstone Studios – Chatsworth, CA.

 


Steve Albini

Microphone Comparisons

Saxophone – R-121, Coles 4038
Trumpet – R-121, Neumann U-67, RCA 77DX
Acoustic Guitars (Steel String, Nylon String, 12-String) – R-121, Schoeps 221B
Electric Guitar – R-121, SM-57, Coles 4038 (being overstressed)
Drums – R-121

Recorded by Steve Albini
Recorded at Electrical Audio, Chicago, IL.

In Royer’s early days, when many people didn’t understand ribbon microphones, Steve Albini was kind enough to make a number of educational recordings for us which we included on our first demonstration CD. Steve is a well-known, well-respected engineer who has plenty of experience with ribbon mics and thousands of engineers and producers have learned from these comparison recordings over the years.

Tape Op Magazine reviewed our Demo CD #1 and said this about Steve’s recordings:
“The ‘something special’ though is the Microphone Comparisons with Steve Albini at the end of the CD. Steve goes through and compares the R-121 to other mics (Coles 4038, SM57, etc.) and provides us with his wonderful dry commentary. We love ya Steve! Truly one of our favorite CDs at the studio these days.” -LC

All of Steve’s comparison tracks are here, along with his original commentary.

Saxophone (Coles 4038, R-121, close R-121, distant R-121)


 

Trumpet (Neuman U-67, R-121, RCA 77DX)


 

Acoustic Guitar (Steel string – Schoeps 221B, R-121 / Nylon string – Schoeps
221B, R-121 / 12-string – tube condenser, R-121, condenser and R-121 blended)


 

Electric Guitar (SM-57, R-121 / Coles 4038 being overstressed)


 

Drums


Ray Charles and Norah Jones with Billy Preston

B-3 – R-122
Piano – SF-12
Electric Guitar – R-121

Engineers: Terry Howard, Al Schmitt (mix)

This extraordinary session was held in Ray Charles’ Los Angeles studio in November 2003. I was privileged to attend and was given permission to take photographs with a small pocket camera. The musicianship was incredible, with most parts of the song being done in one or two takes.
-John Jennings, Royer Labs

B-3: Billy Preston’s Leslie cabinet was miked with two R-122’s, one positioned on the top horn and one on the bottom.

Piano: An SF-12 was positioned inside Ray’s piano alongside a couple of condenser mics. The SF-12 was the main mic used in the final mix.

Electric Guitar: The electric guitar amp was miked with an SM-57 up close and an R-122 further back, blended in the mix.

ray-norah

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